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Thread: What book are you currently reading?

  1. #21

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    Discovery magazine, Shark week book of sharks.

  2. #22
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    I'm slowly making my way through Lord of the Rings for the first time, flitting in between other books when my patience for sixty pages straight of wandering through the woods falls through.

  3. #23

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    ..........
    Last edited by Tsuga; August 31st, 2014 at 09:46 PM.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nashoba View Post
    I'm slowly making my way through Lord of the Rings for the first time, flitting in between other books when my patience for sixty pages straight of wandering through the woods falls through.
    Which is exactly why I didn't finish Fellowship of the Rings when I tried to read it back when the first movie came out in 2001. I may try it again, since I did enjoy The Hobbit this past January and I'm older and, hopefully, more book-savvy now. But 30+ pages of hobbit backstory you never need to know in the first place is just boring...

    "That's wolves for ya', good guys!" -Wolf, t10k
    wolf/werewolf | 36 | female | writer | scuba diver | funny | chaotic good | Hufflepuff | eclectic witch

  5. #25
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    While I can understand how the many pages of backstory and overly-detailed attention given to history and culture in Tolkien's books are boring (or, as some say, bad writing craft), I actually love that stuff. ^^ I reread the books a couple years ago and enjoyed his exposition on bits of Middle-Earth's history and culture as they were scattered throughout the books very much.

  6. #26
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    I actually found it was the physical descriptions of landscapes that got old. I've finished Fellowship of the Ring (and read The Hobbit, though that hardly counts)... and I just had to stop and read something a little better paced. LoTR is next on my reading list, though - I actually bought a used set of LoTR and The Silmarillion in anticipation for when I finish A Dance with Dragons. I think I'll have more patience for the long tedious descriptions than I did when I was 13.

    The culture and to some extent the history is interesting. But his descriptions were lengthy without being that colorful or fun to read. The style was just... a bit dragging.

    Brian Jacques is, I think, an excellent example of an author who spends an exorbitant amount of time describing places and things... but does it so wonderfully that it's always fun to read and puts you right there. I reread Salamandastron a couple summers ago and it was just as fun exploring the Mossflower woods as it was when I was a kid. Such fantastic and fun descriptions.

    bone crossed by patricia briggs (rereading series)
    Ahh, good series, huh? Always happy to find someone else who enjoys it. I can't remember whether it's just the most recent one I haven't read, or the last two that came out. I have a pretty soft spot for a smart and able canine lady who's not a huge wolf. :>
    Last edited by Kisota; July 29th, 2014 at 02:37 PM.

  7. #27
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    Kiso, it's funny you say that about Brian Jacques. I had a totally opposite experience when I went to reread The Legend of Luke a year or so ago. I found his descriptions vivid, but they and the character tropes were so repetitive...or formulaic, maybe? ...that I didn't go on to reread other old favorites from the series because it all felt kind of the same.
    I hope I don't feel that way about it forever, since I really loved those books as a kid and they did a lot to sustain me during the crappiness of middle school.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kisota View Post
    Ahh, good series, huh? Always happy to find someone else who enjoys it. I can't remember whether it's just the most recent one I haven't read, or the last two that came out. I have a pretty soft spot for a smart and able canine lady who's not a huge wolf. :>
    Quite good, and having just finished bone crossed puts me into new territory having read the first four ages back. *epic trumpets* SILVERBOURNE! *fanfare* Good luck on figuring out where you left off. You could just reread the series And, one most definitely agrees. Vampires and werewolves being slightly overdone, it's an excellent change of pace for another mythical critter to take the spot light.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by yourdeer View Post
    Kiso, it's funny you say that about Brian Jacques. I had a totally opposite experience when I went to reread The Legend of Luke a year or so ago. I found his descriptions vivid, but they and the character tropes were so repetitive...or formulaic, maybe? ...that I didn't go on to reread other old favorites from the series because it all felt kind of the same.
    I hope I don't feel that way about it forever, since I really loved those books as a kid and they did a lot to sustain me during the crappiness of middle school.
    Oh, no, you're totally right. The descriptions do start to sound the same when you read a lot of the books (especially since they have the same foods at the feasts and stuff)... and the characters. Well that's just unforgivable. Jacques admitted in a little segment at the end of one of the Redwall cartoon episodes that the boistrous hare general characters that ALWAYS appear were all inspired by one guy he knew. :I Pretty lame, eh, wot wot.

    I remember when I was first reading the books, I got confused at first because I thought the second book I read had some of the same characters. Then I realized the names were actually titles and even though the characters were virtually identical, they were supposed to be different people. Disappointing!

    Obviously the books suffer as well from oversimplifying good and evil (and making predators inherently bad!! :c ) .

    But I always thought they were wonderfully descriptive and immersive. Jacques originally wrote Redwall to share with blind children, which explains the attention to all kinds of details beyond just visual ones.

    It's been about 10 years since I tried Lord of the Rings and I suspect I'll like it better this time around. But man, Jacques is just about tops for me in terms of setting the stage in a fun, non-dragging way.
    Last edited by Kisota; July 30th, 2014 at 10:46 AM.

  10. #30

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    I am reading the Wolf's Rain Manga books. I only have 1 and 2 Manga books, So that is all I can read about the Wolf's Rain version of the anime show. I know that a lot of what we see in the manga books is way more different then what I see in the anime show.

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