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Thread: What positive things has therianthropy done for you?

  1. #1

    Red face What positive things has therianthropy done for you?

    I think it would be nice to have a thread dedicated to the good things about therianthropy and its impact on ourselves. This could be anything, big or small, from helping you deal with grief, to making you spend more time outdoors.

    For me, it's done the following (and more):

    • Given me a sense of purpose and meaning:


    1. In the same way as religion/faith does
    2. It's strengthened my desire to dedicate myself to fighting for my theriotype, such as through volunteering, education, and awareness


    • Made me want to learn everything possible about my theriotype
    • Encouraged me to maintain and improve my fitness (wolves are lean, fit hunters - why should I dishonour this?). This includes going to the gym, eating as clean as is possible, etc.
    • Given me motivation (e.g. to push for that last rep in the gym, to make a healthy meal, etc.)
    • To become more thoughtful, appreciative, and meditative (which has improved my mental health dramatically) - wolves don't lose sleep over the opinions of sheep. I've become less impulsive and more virtuous, largely out of respect for the wider world and myself.
    • To try and get outside more, and learn outdoor/self-sufficiency skills (I love the outdoors, and am trying to get out more now).
    • To be my true self. Being free to be wolf-like, as generally feels natural to me, allows me to be feel freer and less stressed (e.g. howling, running in the woods, increasing my sense of smell through use, etc.). Therianthropy has also explained a lot of my thoughts and behaviours.
    • Meeting and participating in a great community of open-minded, supportive, interesting, and generally awesome people.


    So, what good things do you feel therianthropy has done/does for you? Let's spread the positivity!
    “We have doomed the wolf not for what it is, but for what we deliberately and mistakenly perceive it to be – the mythologized epitome of a savage ruthless killer – which is, in reality, no more than a reflected image of ourself.” - Farley Mowat, Never Cry Wolf

  2. #2

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    Gives me an extra element to my personality. Of course, I'm not out AT ALL and never will be, but I can say I have an interest in cormorants. Have a sort of cormorant theme and vibe going on, but not to the point that it looks "out there."
    If you don't see anything from me in more than a week, chances are good I'm never coming back.
    It rhymes with gurglin'
    Wait no it doesn't

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerguelen View Post
    Gives me an extra element to my personality. Of course, I'm not out AT ALL and never will be, but I can say I have an interest in cormorants. Have a sort of cormorant theme and vibe going on, but not to the point that it looks "out there."
    I forgot to put this one, but I 100% agree with you. I'm definitely not open about my therianthropy whatsoever, although I've mentioned it to two of my closest mates who, in all honesty, are open-minded and would probably playfully tease a bit, but would never hold it against me. Everyone but my family knows that I'm obsessed with wolves though (I would prefer my family not to know right now because I think they'd think I'm crazy, but I think they're getting hints).

    If you don't mind me asking, have you revealed your therianthropy to anyone at all? Do you plan to someday?
    “We have doomed the wolf not for what it is, but for what we deliberately and mistakenly perceive it to be – the mythologized epitome of a savage ruthless killer – which is, in reality, no more than a reflected image of ourself.” - Farley Mowat, Never Cry Wolf

  4. #4

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    I'd love to say that it's inspired me to spend more time in nature, but sadly this isn't the case. It makes me *want* to spend more time in nature, but I am unable to do so.

    I did once start writing a wolf computer game though after I got frustrated with WolfQuest, but I never finished that. I keep meaning to go back to it some time but I have a lot of other projects that I'm working on.
    Psychological therian.

    "I'm only a therian according to my definition of therianthropy." - micheal65536

  5. #5
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    Most of all, it has helped me to understand why I do the things I do, since "birdness" is a complicated thing and quite alien from a human perspective. To be able to tell where all the strange instincts and urges come from is a relief. I'd also say I'm much calmer and more in control of my emotions than before, but that could be just maturing.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by lupusfur View Post
    If you don't mind me asking, have you revealed your therianthropy to anyone at all? Do you plan to someday?
    No and NEVER.
    Not going to jump in front of that train.
    If you don't see anything from me in more than a week, chances are good I'm never coming back.
    It rhymes with gurglin'
    Wait no it doesn't

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    Ok I'm confused.
    Quote Originally Posted by lupusfur View Post
    • To be my true self. Being free to be wolf-like, as generally feels natural to me, allows me to be feel freer and less stressed (e.g. howling, running in the woods, increasing my sense of smell through use, etc.). Therianthropy has also explained a lot of my thoughts and behaviours.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sula View Post
    Most of all, it has helped me to understand why I do the things I do, since "birdness" is a complicated thing and quite alien from a human perspective. To be able to tell where all the strange instincts and urges come from is a relief.
    But... if it wasn't for therianthropy, you wouldn't have those thoughts and behaviors in the first place. Therianthropy raises lots of questions and answers none. Right?

    And with no therianthropy, you could be your true self just by doing human things.

    But anyway...

    Therianthropy is why I can go up tall ladders. I have a debilitating fear of heights in human mode.

    It makes me more patient. If I have a long wait, I shift just enough to perceive time differently. More generally, I tend to plod along slowly and deliberately, thinking more than doing. There are circumstances where that's a good thing.

    Shifts tend to achieve some of the same results as mindfulness meditation, without me having to learn to meditate.

    I like eating leaves, and leaves tend to be pretty healthy food.

    And being a therian means I know therianthropy is real. Knowing that something that seems this weird is actually real opens my mind. And blows my mind. My mind is blown open.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerguelen View Post
    No and NEVER.
    Not going to jump in front of that train.
    Fair enough. I suppose it's one of those things which, if you were to reveal to the wrong people, could end up going against you.
    “We have doomed the wolf not for what it is, but for what we deliberately and mistakenly perceive it to be – the mythologized epitome of a savage ruthless killer – which is, in reality, no more than a reflected image of ourself.” - Farley Mowat, Never Cry Wolf

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueSloth View Post
    But... if it wasn't for therianthropy, you wouldn't have those thoughts and behaviors in the first place. Therianthropy raises lots of questions and answers none. Right?

    And with no therianthropy, you could be your true self just by doing human things.
    I think the point here (particularly in the first quote, from lupusfur) is that knowing about therianthropy has inspired them to indulge more in their wolf side, rather than resisting.
    Psychological therian.

    "I'm only a therian according to my definition of therianthropy." - micheal65536

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueSloth View Post
    Ok I'm confused.


    But... if it wasn't for therianthropy, you wouldn't have those thoughts and behaviors in the first place. Therianthropy raises lots of questions and answers none. Right?

    And with no therianthropy, you could be your true self just by doing human things.
    I'd have behaved like that anyway, but without understanding exactly why. Having an explanation (or at least a theory) for why I had urges to [insert wolf-like behaviour which isn't normal for humans] is liberating. Micheal was also right in saying that knowing about therianthropy has allowed me to feel I'm able to act more like that, instead of just thinking 'What the hell am I doing? Like, when did this become a thing and why can't I just be fully normal?'. This is especially important as I'm usually very logical and science-focussed.

    Therianthropy is why I can go up tall ladders. I have a debilitating fear of heights in human mode.
    That's a very specific thing, but I love it. Thinking about it, I've had similar experiences. So for example, if I go into the woods on my own at night, or anything similar, if I can m-shift into my wolf to the right extent, I'm not nervous or on edge as much.

    Shifts tend to achieve some of the same results as mindfulness meditation, without me having to learn to meditate.
    True. The change in mental perspective can help clear my mind.

    I like eating leaves, and leaves tend to be pretty healthy food.
    I can relate to this too. I love eating meat, so I'm getting plenty of protein.

    And being a therian means I know therianthropy is real. Knowing that something that seems this weird is actually real opens my mind. And blows my mind. My mind is blown open.
    So do you think it helps in spiritual or existential sense?
    Last edited by lupusfur; May 13th, 2017 at 09:26 AM.
    “We have doomed the wolf not for what it is, but for what we deliberately and mistakenly perceive it to be – the mythologized epitome of a savage ruthless killer – which is, in reality, no more than a reflected image of ourself.” - Farley Mowat, Never Cry Wolf

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