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Thread: Steppenwolf

  1. #1
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    Default Steppenwolf

    Hello everybody,

    I can't possibly imagine that this has never been brought up before on this forum, but I'll ask it anyway. Have any of you ever read Hermann Hesse's 1927 novel, Steppenwolf? It's about a wolf therian and his experiences being torn between generations. It's not my favorite Hesse novel (that would be Demian), but like much of what he wrote it's very much ahead of its time. It lends as much credence as anything to the notion that therianthropy is universal and not just a product of the Internet age, as much as communities like this have helped us find these experiences in ourselves.

    CG

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    I've heard of the band Steppenwolf, but not the novel. It sounds like it might be worth a read though. It's hard to find well-written things about animal-people.

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    The band is named after the novel. I highly recommend it, Hesse is terrific.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisgazeent View Post
    The band is named after the novel. I highly recommend it, Hesse is terrific.
    I figured there was some kind of connection between the two. I'll have to see if I can't find it on Amazon or at the library. I always need something to read.

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    I think, that is if he's still around, Wilhelm knows a lot about said writer Hermann Hesse and his book The Steppenwolf.
    Wilhelm was last seen on Werelist last year - a very intelligent chap too I reckon.

    I considered him to be one of my friends.
    About the book, it must be a terrific read, though I haven't read it yet.
    Most book stores still sell it, and if not, you can find a copy of it online presumably.

  6. #6
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    We first read the book years ago in high school. Recently, back in early April we listened to an audiobook version Steppenwolf again. Also, our university had a copy of Treatise on the Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse & Jaroslav Brada which is a book combining the "Treatise on the Steppenwolf" from within the novel and images of paintings based on the novel created by & Jaroslav Brada which we read several times on its own.

    Harry in the Steppenwolf certainly does read as a wolf therian. However, the book doesn't wholly focus on Harry's wolfness alone throughout the story. Rather it comes off as more of a part of him as a character that has a pair part of play in the plot of the story. Which actually many of us in our system rather like to be honest. The therian overtones, if you will, are strongest in the "Treatise on the Steppenwolf" section of the book mentioned earlier. Many of us relate to a number of the parts within it personally for our own therianthropy.

    A word of warning to people who are thinking of reading it through, the book is very heavy on the philosophy. The characters make references to philosophical figures and such throughout the novel and much of the book is spent diving headlong into pondering philosophy. (Many parts of the book goes dozens of pages without Harry actually interacting with anyone or any dialogue between characters occuring.) I'll be honest, we needed nearly get as much at of the novel at 18 as we did at 28 due to so much of the philosophy either going over our head or being skimmed over because it bored our 18-year-old-selves. I will say on the behave of the rest of our system that chewing through all of it gets the most out of the novel though.

    Overall, we wouldn't call it our favorite book, but it does rank high-ish on our list of books that had an influence on us in our early adult years. Plus, its an interesting piece of literature to boot as well. So warmly recommended but be prepared for a diving into some thick philosophical stuff to get to the therian overtones.

    - Earth Listener (aleurodon and luna moth)

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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisgazeent View Post
    Hello everybody,

    I can't possibly imagine that this has never been brought up before on this forum, but I'll ask it anyway. Have any of you ever read Hermann Hesse's 1927 novel, Steppenwolf? It's about a wolf therian and his experiences being torn between generations. It's not my favorite Hesse novel (that would be Demian), but like much of what he wrote it's very much ahead of its time. It lends as much credence as anything to the notion that therianthropy is universal and not just a product of the Internet age, as much as communities like this have helped us find these experiences in ourselves.

    CG
    In all the years I'd worked in bookstores I had no idea that book had anything to do with wolves. Dayam.

    Forever Running, RunningRed

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