Page 13 of 13 FirstFirst ... 3111213
Results 121 to 127 of 127

Thread: How do you like to sleep?

  1. #121
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    169

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kisota View Post
    For a while when I was 12, I used to listen to System of a Down's album Toxicity *every night* to go to sleep. It was ten years later before I realized how goddamn weird that is.

    Just little adolescent Kiso, nodding off to Prison Song. So hey, sometimes punky noise is good for sleepin, I guess! (Not that SOAD is punk, per se, but same angry energy, haha!)
    Ahah I love the edgyness of that! I'm not sure that it'd make it into many YouTube sleep playlists though.
    "We have doomed the wolf not for what it is, but for what we deliberately and mistakenly perceive it to be––the mythologized epitome of a savage, ruthless killer––which is, in reality, no more than the reflected image of ourself." – Farley Mowat, Never Cry Wolf

  2. #122
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    somewhere in Russia
    Posts
    98

    Default

    My outdoor experience and some events in my life are heavily influenced my sleeping habits.

    I spent a lot of time in the forests alone, often sleep near the campfire, my trips are pretty long and sometimes are in difficult conditions, weather, and with hard physical activity. So most civilized sleeping habits are just not compatible with this lifestyle.

    First skill I got during my early outdoor experience - is the habit to control surroundings during the sleep including the ability to maintain the campfire. The fire is dimming and it's getting cold, or the log burned in the half and rolled out of the fire. The wind pulled out the peg. Or rain starts and the closing or footwear is outside. Small animals trying to steal food, or big animals nearby, like a moose or bear. Or sudden human activity.

    However, the trick is to be able to sleep anyway. And not to react on things that are not require attention - like a falling stick or cone, creaking tree, rain drops, wind, small birds, insects, and so on. Maintaining the balance between alertness in the sleep and good sleep. The brain quickly learns if forced in this conditions for a long enough time. And the general habit to live in natural environment, being familiar and comfortable with it - is the key here.

    Second useful skill I gained during long and hard travels - is using every opportunity to rest, and making maximum of it. And there may be no opportunity - I had hurricanes during the night, or extreme thunderstorms, or wild animals, or the need to move in the middle of the night... And on the other hand there may be some unexpected opportunities at any time. So, being able to rest well - is very important in long autonomous trips with high physical demands. It translates not only in effectiveness of movement, but also in adaptiveness and safety. Now I always sleep well, no matter of time or conditions...

    I don't like soft surfaces. I'm pretty comfortable to sleep on the ground, and even don't need it to be perfectly flat. My sleeping pad (if I use it) is not very thick and not making it much softer. At home I sleep on DIY bed I made very long time ago, and it also not very soft...

    I sleep pretty compact, because it's more efficient to keep warm. And during winter trips I often sleep on the relatively narrow bunk made of wooden poles, pretty close to the campfire...

    Related to time - I can sleep at any time equally well early or late, or in the day, or in separate parts... And I easily can switch my regime. It is not only related to "wild sleeping habits" but also to some past events in my life...


    Taking some persons with me, I find that most of them struggling for a while to sleep in natural conditions. But adaptation comes relatively quickly. Two weeks of decently hard autonomous trip is usually enough for it.

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    The West
    Posts
    3,633
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lupus Paws View Post
    Ahah I love the edgyness of that! I'm not sure that it'd make it into many YouTube sleep playlists though.
    I certainly never thought it was edgy when I was doing it. I never even really talked about it with anyone. I was not a remotely edgy adolescent. I just really liked the music (and still do!) Maybe the next time I have insomnia, I should throw that album on and see if it puts me out?? Haha!

    And yeah, Forest Wind, do you find that you actually sleep better on a lot of your outdoor adventures, so long as the conditions are alright for it? One of the reasons I enjoy field work is that the strenuous activity helps me sleep a lot better, even when I’m always having to rest away from home.

  4. #124
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    somewhere in Russia
    Posts
    98

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kisota
    And yeah, Forest Wind, do you find that you actually sleep better on a lot of your outdoor adventures, so long as the conditions are alright for it? One of the reasons I enjoy field work is that the strenuous activity helps me sleep a lot better, even when I’m always having to rest away from home.
    I can say, sleep is naturally much more pleasant when being tired after some strenuous activity) But as for the sleep quality - I always sleep equally well now, no matter of conditions. It's like my body realized in some point that it should use maximum of any available rest time.

    Maybe the habit to sleep near the campfire also helped, because it usually mean several wake-ups during the night to fix the fire and add firewood. And than I fall asleep almost instantly. Even not sure, if I am fully waking up to do this. Somewhere on the edge.

    It may also naturally train (in almost animal training way) the ability to fall asleep very fast and efficient, because the faster you do this after small wake-ups, the more time you will have for actual sleep, which mean better rest. And you can imagine how well it may work after, say, two month outdoors, where almost all nights were spent with the campfires.

    Sleeping near the fire is very natural for me now, so I often lit the small fire even if I am not necessary need it, just for the feel of comfort. I love this contrast feeling when you have some external heat source, and find it very cosy. And it also helps to reduce (sometimes completely) the amount of mosquitoes, prevents dew from falling off from the morning fog, and so on...
    Last edited by Forest Wind; July 29th, 2020 at 04:30 AM.

  5. #125
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    1,281
    Blog Entries
    12

    Default

    Interesting, Forest Wind! I have the opportunity to quite literally sleep in the field or woods, in a tent. I'm curious about the effect it might have on my circadian rhythm. I'm naturally a night owl. Nocturnal, even, and I'm not exaggerating. Sleeping outdoors might help me to coordinate my sleep schedule with the sun in the way that most people are genetically predisposed to be. Waking up at dawn or before dawn. I might actually try that this month, or next month... and yes to campfires! They're very comforting, as you mention, and I love the smell.

    I have Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder (DSPD) and a melatonin abnormality that might or might not be related to it. The PER4/clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of my brainstem make me fall asleep after sunrise. This is obviously incredibly inconvenient, especially if I want a career in wildlife conservation that involves daytime field work. I wonder if I can hack it. Alter it. These days I mostly fall asleep around 2 am, but I wake up late, around noon, and I'm groggy until late afternoon.

    It takes LOTS of physical activity to tire me out enough that I fall asleep close to midnight. Professional fireworks shows can do it. Heavy physical work in the sun starting early in the day. Intellectual satiety can do it as well; writing a long and thorough research paper, for example, until I'm way past tired. I usually alternate between sloth and manic energy.

    Kiso managed to get me into SOAD, haha. Good band. I think I'll name my next laptop Punk Noise Machine.

    Someone on a site I used to visit said that punk rock prepared them for a life of poverty. Hard same. :P Science doesn't pay well!
    Last edited by Coyote Jones; July 31st, 2020 at 09:16 PM.

  6. #126
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    15

    Default

    I go for MAXIMUM coziness when I sleep. Loads of blankets and at LEAST two pillows: One for my head and one to wrap my arms around. Not only is having something to hug nice, but without the arm pillow, my shoulder kinda squishes down onto my neck if that makes sense??? I always wake up with my neck all sore and stiff if I sleep without one. I'm prone to neck aches anyway so the last thing I need is to wake up to that.

  7. #127
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    6,245
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    I like heavy sheets. Even in summer, with warm humid nights, I've got two quilts, a sheet, and a blanket. Feel enclosed is nice; when I don't have much on top of me or the covers aren't tucked in that well, I tend to move around a lot. Thankfully I don't fall off.

    Far as posture, I do sometimes curl up, but more often I sleep on my side or my front. Which, while habit, doesn't really feel good long term. Don't think it's that great for my ability to breath deeply.

    Quote Originally Posted by Coyote Jones View Post
    Sleeping outdoors might help me to coordinate my sleep schedule with the sun in the way that most people are genetically predisposed to be. Waking up at dawn or before dawn.
    I've noticed this happening. When there's fewer distractions and no electric lightning, it really does help one get to sleep earlier in the evening. Pretty regularly got to sleep at 8:00 or 9:00 PM when camping; at home it's usually around midnight that I sleep. Plus the sounds of wildlife are nice to fall asleep to. There were a lot of coyotes to listen to in the desert.
    "If you are worthy of his affection, a cat will be your friend but never your slave. He keeps his free will though he loves, and will not do for you what he thinks unreasonable; but if he once gives himself to you, it is with absolute confidence and fidelity of affection." -Theophile Gautier

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •