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Thread: Downshifting and Simple Living

  1. #31

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    @ Mahigan - I reset the font back the the default style for you. I've no idea what it was before but it was definitely not the default font style.
    Last edited by Somnia; November 7th, 2015 at 09:43 AM.

  2. #32
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    Odd. Well in any case, thank you for pointing it out and for the quick fix!
    Run with your brothers and sisters. Do you feel our hearts beat in time with yours?

  3. #33
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    I grew up pretty poor. I never got anything unless I bought it with my own money. My parents though where pack rats, and had hoarded so much stuff. I eventually picked up on their habits, and had hoarded a lot of shit. I lived out in the country. A town 50 miles from anything big. It had only like 1k people living in there. It was pretty simple. Other than all the crap that is. When I moved out of my folks house. I literally threw 99% of my crap away. I tossed most of my clothes, material possessions, and other bullshit. I think the only thing I took with me was my comp, sword collection. A few nick knacks, and my cats. I tell you what, throwing all of that way was literally like taking a load off. It was hard at first, but you don't miss the junk.

    I once wanted to live in the woods. I could build my own house. Oh so tempted. I also once pondered on becoming a Buddhist monk. Just to let go of everything. I could do it, I know I can. Just, I got things going for me. I like my internet, my fiance. If something terrible happened in my life, and it all disappeared. I probably would turn to it. I'm a pretty simple person.
    I'll bleed out all these tears and take this pain
    Maybe the path is fighting in vain
    And I can't carry on, I just can't be the one, again...

  4. #34
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    I've had a thought since I last replied to this thread...
    In regards to simple living, what is everyone's opinion of yurts (both modern and Mongolian)?

    http://www.yurts.com/why/default.aspx

    http://www.rainier.com/yurts/

    http://mongolian-yurt.com/

    Apparently they can be customized to semi-modern living, depending on how much money you want to spend, but are ultimately much more cost-effective and nature-preserving than regular housing.
    I'm seriously considering it, and it would be interesting to know what you guys think.
    "You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body." - C.S. Lewis

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudfoot View Post
    I've had a thought since I last replied to this thread...
    In regards to simple living, what is everyone's opinion of yurts (both modern and Mongolian)?

    http://www.yurts.com/why/default.aspx

    http://www.rainier.com/yurts/

    http://mongolian-yurt.com/

    Apparently they can be customized to semi-modern living, depending on how much money you want to spend, but are ultimately much more cost-effective and nature-preserving than regular housing.
    I'm seriously considering it, and it would be interesting to know what you guys think.
    I've always loved yurts, but they aren't permanent housing and the climate they do best in is limited (of course) so it wouldn't be an option for lots of people. Which is to say, if you want to have housing that allows for basements, a yurt would have to become stationary or the below-dwelling can't be part of the house. Also, not good for earthquakes or long term desert dwelling. The design doesn't lend itself to multiple-units put together that I know of either, so you are stuck with one room all the time even if there is a village of them.

    I would look deeper into whatever your climate is and the types of building that has been traditionally favored (and find out why). There are lots of modern building techniques that people keep even when they are investigating "older" materials (like cob construction) to get the best out of what we have today versus having some local materials that one can build with themselves and is a good thermal mass.

  6. #36
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    Not so much into the yurts, as like herringbone pointed out they have a limited climate range. Always wanted to build my own little cabin, though. I also always wanted to get around by dogsled, but that's another story!
    Run with your brothers and sisters. Do you feel our hearts beat in time with yours?

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudfoot View Post
    I've had a thought since I last replied to this thread...
    In regards to simple living, what is everyone's opinion of yurts (both modern and Mongolian)?

    http://www.yurts.com/why/default.aspx

    http://www.rainier.com/yurts/

    http://mongolian-yurt.com/

    Apparently they can be customized to semi-modern living, depending on how much money you want to spend, but are ultimately much more cost-effective and nature-preserving than regular housing.
    I'm seriously considering it, and it would be interesting to know what you guys think.
    Thank you for posting the link cloudy. That beats the hell out of my tent. I think you should go for it. Great now I got to decide on whether or not I want to buy an R.V motorhome or a yurt. Cloudy, The question is, 1. Where are you going to put the yurt when you get it.? and question 2. Is what if you decide on moving to some place else.? Can it be moved.?

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by herringbone View Post
    I've always loved yurts, but they aren't permanent housing and the climate they do best in is limited (of course) so it wouldn't be an option for lots of people. Which is to say, if you want to have housing that allows for basements, a yurt would have to become stationary or the below-dwelling can't be part of the house. Also, not good for earthquakes or long term desert dwelling. The design doesn't lend itself to multiple-units put together that I know of either, so you are stuck with one room all the time even if there is a village of them.

    I would look deeper into whatever your climate is and the types of building that has been traditionally favored (and find out why). There are lots of modern building techniques that people keep even when they are investigating "older" materials (like cob construction) to get the best out of what we have today versus having some local materials that one can build with themselves and is a good thermal mass.
    From what I understand, there's several people in Alaska living in Yurts http://www.adventureparents.com/adve...ving-in-a-yurt (Like this family here)

    I don't really care for basements, actually, so that part wouldn't bother me.

    My climate... Is temperate. It rarely climbs above the 80s in the summer, and almost never drops below the 30s in winter. There's nothing like tornadoes, and I only remember one memorable earthquake in my whole lifetime, and it didn't destroy anything. The most concerning problem I would worry about is mold or rot, so I'd have to take some measures in that area.

    Traditional housing in the pacific northwest....I believe the original peoples lived in longhouses. That's far too much space for just me (since it was supposed to be for entire families), and it would be difficult to heat, I'd think. I am talking about just me, here, haha, not a family. I'm on my own.

    In answer to hotdog's questions....

    1. I would buy a plot of land. It's a matter of money, just like the yurt itself would be.
    2. It is extremely moveable. It was the traditional housing of nomads in Mongolia, and they favored it because it could be easily transported.
    "You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body." - C.S. Lewis

  9. #39
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    Anyone familiar with WWOOF? World Wide Organization of Organic Farmers:
    http://www.wwoofusa.org/About_WWOOFUSA
    As I mentioned, I'm moving out to the West Coast come August, and I found this to be a wonderful way of simple living (at least for the time being). I'm pretty psyched. Basically, you volunteer for half a day at an organic farm (or orchard, winery, etc.) and the owners provide you with food and a place to stay as long as you're there. Couldn't ask for better than that! I think it'll be a great opportunity to learn more about organic farming and practices as well as get used to living simply and off the land. I do confess I still dream of an Otherkin commune... perhaps this will give me a leg up if I ever decide to start or join one.
    Run with your brothers and sisters. Do you feel our hearts beat in time with yours?

  10. #40
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    I think the downshifting and simple living movements intriguing and wonderful ideas. No doubt people have been doing it for as long as society has had excess, but what's remarkable to me is that it needs to be a movement at all, and that so many are finding those movements helpful and transformative in their lives.

    I've an interesting household situation in that I don't have a bed to sleep on or table to write at, yet am comfortable and happy for not having debts and having all my survival needs met, leaving me room to work on doing nice things and overcoming obstacles to living my dreams. (None of those obstacles involves buying more stuff or spending more large amounts of money - instead, they involve reducing the amount of money I need to spend to make my dreams reality and live meaningfully.) It still takes mindfulness to consciously want less, keep less, and focus on the more meaningful and non-material riches in life, but I also don't begrudge splurging in the moment on something wonderful to enrich life's experience.

    I just try not to have expectations or desires, or being swept up into things that demand more than I am comfortable giving; but if I can afford something nice that is meaningful to me and makes a positive impact for the rest of my life, and perhaps the life of others, I'll pay for it with no regrets. And I usually find ways of being able to, with patience.

    I also believe in the philosophy that happiness is not tied to pleasure, be they material pleasure or satisfaction from achievement. That with basic needs met, and some outlets for living dreams and sharing passions, happiness can be deep and long-lasting indeed when the distractions and stresses of faster, busier lives are left behind. That in itself is enough reason for me to have chosen not to pursue lucrative study and career paths otherwise offered to me. I'm sure some call me a fool, but I live my life the way I feel I'm meant to live, not the way society expects me to live when giving me the opportunity, and I'm happy.

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