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Thread: Favorite Animal Documentaries.

  1. #51
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    I noticed Fruit mentioned Penguins: Spy In The Huddle, which I have to admit is a very cute series.

    I really like David Attenborough's Life In The Undergrowth series, all about insects. It introduces some very interesting species with their own perky little characteristics about each and every one of them. Most people don't realise just how many different types of insects there are or just how complex their social systems can get.
    Multiples: Ayla (host/front), Kaigan (second-fronter), Liana, Vincent, Saskia, Spencer, Charlotte, Lucas, Flynne, Gravel

    Avatar by ruskova

  2. #52
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    Just watched Blackfish, it was amazing and I learned a lot about orca. Fantastic and depressing documentary.
    I'll bleed out all these tears and take this pain
    Maybe the path is fighting in vain
    And I can't carry on, I just can't be the one, again...

  3. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowItami View Post
    Just watched Blackfish, it was amazing and I learned a lot about orca. Fantastic and depressing documentary.
    I watched it about 2 times already. When I was watching it. I saw that the seaworld people where lying about how long the whales live out in the wild. Among other things. If I ever go to seaworld or work at seaworld. I'm going to tell the people what really happens there.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by hotdogwolf View Post
    I watched it about 2 times already. When I was watching it. I saw that the seaworld people where lying about how long the whales live out in the wild. Among other things. If I ever go to seaworld or work at seaworld. I'm going to tell the people what really happens there.
    Adding to the Blackfish commentary: I'd known a lot about the attacks and the horrible conditions of the orcas going into it, but nothing about the way Seaworld went in denial. I was surprised at how even-handed the documentary was by just presenting interviews without commentary, even if the Seaworld representatives refused to be interviewed. I wouldn't either if I was being as dishonest and getting at it as they were.

  5. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anarron View Post
    Adding to the Blackfish commentary: I'd known a lot about the attacks and the horrible conditions of the orcas going into it, but nothing about the way Seaworld went in denial. I was surprised at how even-handed the documentary was by just presenting interviews without commentary, even if the Seaworld representatives refused to be interviewed. I wouldn't either if I was being as dishonest and getting at it as they were.
    Oh there in denial big time. There even fighting in court about the close contact between trainers and the whales. The people at seaworld are in denial about everything that goes on there. From the whale attacks on other whales to the trainers. Yet they don't want to do anything because it would hurt there business, Business of making money. That's all they care about.

  6. #56
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    I'm looking for a documentary about foxes- does anyone know of one?

  7. #57

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    Not really a favorite document but it's short and informative. Video explaining how the wolves that were reintroduced in Yellowstone National Park in the 90s helped shape and improved the ecosystem.

    How Wolves Change Rivers

    The video explains how despite human efforts to control the deer population the efforts failed in comparison to introducing wolves to the ecosystem. Doing research on the history of reintroducing wolves into Yellowstone, humans were only able to slow down the overgrazing by trying to control the deer population, but the ecosystem never improved. In my opinion, while humans can try their best efforts to control animal populations, natural predators will always be more efficient at controlling animal populations in a healthy way compared to human efforts. That doesn't mean we should never attempt to control animal populations or stop trying to learn and understand from it, it just shows there is evidence that proves nature can be more effective at fixing the ecosystem than humans in some situations.
    Last edited by Somnia; February 22nd, 2014 at 07:55 AM.

  8. #58
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    I recall watching a couple episodes of "Growing Up..." on Animal Planet. Hyena and Wolf were particularly cute. Not really documentary-ish, but. Kind of related!

  9. #59

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    I've been getting into a new animal/nature documentary on National Geographic called "Kingdom of the North." I really love narrated documentaries like that. The episode I watched showed how migrating salmon affects the ecosystem and how the animals help distribute the dead fish into the forest which helps nourish the plants and trees. Really cool watching a wolf fishing for salmon.

  10. #60
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    I just finished watching this https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=RWmOtXSAr1M

    It was very good, and it talked a lot about the social structure of wolf packs.

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