Page 12 of 12 FirstFirst ... 2101112
Results 111 to 118 of 118

Thread: What book are you currently reading?

  1. #111

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elinox View Post
    Ooh, let me know how it is. I'm going to Yellowstone next September!
    HAHA, Oh that's way better then a book but I will let you know how it is. I only had time to skim though it. Enjoy Yellowstone.

  2. #112
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    N.Y
    Posts
    684
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    Jez... I've soaked up the warrior series and there's another new part on its way (still haven't read the last VoS series..). I really don't have the room right now to house all these damn books about cats killing cats. But damn, i'll try.

    I'm in an interesting bind due to it though... i'm so used to and can relate to the animal perspective/ content that I feel as if I don't want to read anything away from that haha. I just bought the first book of Game of Thrones a month ago and looking at the long character list it seems like a chore (says vintage whom has dozens of characters in her own work).

    @Cheetah, i'll look up those authors as well. I'll post back if I find something interesting.

  3. #113
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    The West
    Posts
    3,466
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    I know if the Warriors series had been around when I was younger, I would have lost my mind over it.

    Welp, I've made it through the second in the Millenium / Dragon Tattoo series. I continue to be increasingly disappointed that there were no more Fincher movies after the first one. As good as the Swedish films are, I like Rooney Mara's interpretation of Lisbeth best. Less aggressive, more strange.

    The second book is a lot more action oriented and comic-booky. It would have made a more appealing film for an American audience.

    I've also just finished The Communist Manifesto. A quick read with a fair amount of information relevant primarily to the specific time period, but definitely a fascinating read.

    Next on my list is to pick up and actually finish Desert Solitaire. I've re-read a portion of the beginning, which I've read before... but that was years ago. And I've since actually lived and worked a LOT like Abbey does in Arches National Park, (cold trailers and solitude included!), so it was really poignant to the point of being eye-watering.

    I just visited Arches for the first time last month, as well, so it seems like an ideal time.

  4. #114
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    N.Y
    Posts
    684
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    I made/am making a list, but I gotta rant a bit:

    So it took a while to find adult animal/animal pov books (especially the pov) without *trying* to fall back into classics like 'call of the wild', 'animal farm', 'war horse', etc- sometimes it can't be helped. Are things just too taboo to discuss in animal pov? Animals kill, animals can do disturbing things in human eyes, animals mate, hunt and forage. As a writer myself I always crave a balance between animalistic and humanistic, but still keeping the animal part quite clear. I will accept things can be more tongue in cheek while covering those topics, like My Cat Yugoslavia. I don't mind books about anthro-type animals dealing with human social issues. In fact, I actually rather like that- as a therian personally anyway. It's just a rare type of genre to find.


    I was about to just start writing/re-reading my own stories because google insists on giving me these 'age 13 and up' books about animals. I decided to dig a little deeper. Call me specific, but I warriors is kind of where I draw the line with that. Maybe, perhaps it's the fact that animal pov is kind of a niche area that is often suited for children. Anyway, I did find some books, and then through the wonderful recommended page I found even more. I'll give a short synopsis my book list:

    Current list/will be getting:
    -Warriors by Erin Hunter- the Vos series, and the new book once it's out

    -Game of Thrones (might not do the series, but the first book depending..)

    -Watership Down by Richard Adams: "band of rabbits in flight from the incursion of man and the destruction of their home." (It seems like a popular-ish book, but the rabbit part was interesting to me.)

    -The Scorpio Races by Maggie Stiefvator: Water horse racing- the male dominated sport which can also kill you. Sign me up!

    -The Bees by Laline Paull: "brilliantly imagined debut set in an ancient culture where only the queen may breed and deformity means death." (based on the descriptions/reviews, this is somewhat what I was ranting about above. Books like these with balance, but still has distinct animalism).

    -Heartsridge Shifters by Olivia Arran:
    "It’s a new world. Shifters are no longer a secret and they’re ready to fight for their right to live free." (Bear shapeshifters. I can't get over the buff looking men on the cover...but apparently hot people on the cover is a staple of supernatural books. My grandmother reads a lot of them-so this is a known fact lol. Sounds interesting enough to try).


    I think that's more than enough for me, especially considering some are series- so I'm looking at a good 20 books to read. I read at varying speeds so this is a good list for me.
    Timber wolf therian-- changeling-- horse hearted
    ~Being kin is a journey of finding yourself, loosing yourself, searching and doing it all over again.~

  5. #115
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    270
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    The Communist Manifesto isn't really a good one to start with, partially because of its brevity which doesn't really allow someone who isn't moderately well versed in 19th century history to understand it, but also because it was written in 1848. 1848 marked a turning point in European history and for Marx's thought in particular. Europe was rocked by a wave of revolutions in both 1832 and 1848, but 1848 marked a significant change from the past. At this time, most of Europe was ruled by continuations of the old medieval Kingdoms. The old revolutions such as in 1832 raised much of the same demands as that of the French Revolution, the creation of a modern state based on liberal promises: the right of private property, freedom of association, non-hereditary suffrage, etc; a modern capitalist state essentialy. What changed in 1848 is that the capitalists themselves no longer would fight for 'their own' liberal values, but instead sided with the aristocracy in crushing the lower classes that demanded liberal reform.

    It took Marx some years to realize the significance of this change. He theorized this change had occurred because the growth of capitalism and the concomitant growth of the working class enabled the possibility of communism. For any revolutionary change in society to occur, even from a quasi-medieval Kingdom to a modern liberal state, it needed to politically mobilize the bulk of the population. The danger is that in mobilizing the working class, that there would be no reason for them to simply stop at rights and privileges for capitalists, but continue on to truly realize 'liberty, fraternity, and equality' which the French Revolution promised by failed to deliver. This resulted in the seemingly paradoxical situation of capitalists siding with the aristocracy against middle class and working class reformers and revolutionaries against change that would be more favorable for liberalism. This is more or less what happened in the French Revolution itself, with the "Thermidorean reaction" against the Jacobins.

    Marx of the 1860's reached his intellectual maturity, that's a better place for something representative. A much superior book to begin with is The German Ideology, which was Marx's critique of Hegel's idealism and laid the foundation for his thought. Even then, a basic knowledge of the history of the French Revolution and late 18th and early 19th century German philosophy, Emanuel Kant in particular, is more or less mandatory or else you're going to be wrestling with references that you won't understand, preventing you from grasping the actual thrust of the points and arguments being made. Anyway, just this history nerd's take on it!


    I finished The Road by Cormac McCarthy recently. I really enjoyed it. The prose is kind of simplistic, but that doesn't take away from its emotional and thematic presence in my opinion. Think I'm going to try Blood Meridian soon, which he also wrote.

    Currently reading a recent 2018 biography of Winston Churchill, and also reading Three Comrades by Remarque. Remarque is really good, I've been reading through his books in the order they were written. All Quiet and The Road Back I've read once before, but it's been a decade.

    Game of Thrones was OK, I read the series in about a month 6 years ago, hard to believe it's been that long. I might reread it again someday. Not really a huge fan of escapist fantasy, just not my cup of tea.

  6. #116
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Southwest
    Posts
    6,110
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vintage View Post
    -Heartsridge Shifters by Olivia Arran:
    "It’s a new world. Shifters are no longer a secret and they’re ready to fight for their right to live free." (Bear shapeshifters. I can't get over the buff looking men on the cover...but apparently hot people on the cover is a staple of supernatural books. My grandmother reads a lot of them-so this is a known fact lol. Sounds interesting enough to try).


    I think that's more than enough for me, especially considering some are series- so I'm looking at a good 20 books to read. I read at varying speeds so this is a good list for me.
    I stay clear of all paranormal romance books like that. Their notion of "animalism" tends to be very warped, and they tend to smack of patriarchy from the few I've managed to get any distance into. Even the better writers like Patricia Briggs have those flaws; I think it's just part of the genre by this point.
    "If you are worthy of his affection, a cat will be your friend but never your slave. He keeps his free will though he loves, and will not do for you what he thinks unreasonable; but if he once gives himself to you, it is with absolute confidence and fidelity of affection." -Theophile Gautier

  7. #117
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    N.Y
    Posts
    684
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cheetah View Post
    I stay clear of all paranormal romance books like that. Their notion of "animalism" tends to be very warped, and they tend to smack of patriarchy from the few I've managed to get any distance into. Even the better writers like Patricia Briggs have those flaws; I think it's just part of the genre by this point.
    Oh definitely. I'll just be reading it for fun. I never take 'model on cover' books seriously. Not even my aunt's books haha. She writes romance anyway. I always like to try certain books to 'open' my mind when it comes to writing styles concerning animals...or in this case, shifters- to which my kintype kind of is-but in an illusionist sense. Anything to help me write.
    Timber wolf therian-- changeling-- horse hearted
    ~Being kin is a journey of finding yourself, loosing yourself, searching and doing it all over again.~

  8. #118
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    N.Y
    Posts
    684
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    I see that watership down is a new netflix movie. Imagine that. I had no idea! Must've just came out. I think I'll watch that first before getting the book. The book probably has way more details, so if I like the movie, the book will certainly be of interest.

    ...and if it sucks...well then *crosses book off the list* (kidding. I like books too much for that)

    Edit: I see now that this is a limited series (about an hour each episode), so...Spoiler-city here I come! I'll probably get the book because watching and reading are totally different experiences imo.
    Last edited by Vintage; December 29th, 2018 at 10:19 PM.
    Timber wolf therian-- changeling-- horse hearted
    ~Being kin is a journey of finding yourself, loosing yourself, searching and doing it all over again.~

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •