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Thread: The Daily Thought - The 24th!

  1. #821
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    Quote Originally Posted by hotdogwolf View Post
    I maybe staying up tonight for 2021. Maybe. I just had dinner. Chinese food. Now it's time for cookies.
    Chinese food sounds good. I had gluten free chicken nuggets... Not looking forward to the fireworks tonight

  2. #822

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    I just watched Hitchcock's The Birds for the first time the other day. I've seen bits and pieces of it on TV over the years. I remember it was on all the time back in the 90's, but I never watched the full thing from beginning to end. Incredible movie. I don't think anything like it could be made today. Nothing much really happens in the film until about 55 minutes in, when it's nearly halfway over. I can't imagine a modern apocalyptic movie that doesn't have 'the event' within the first 15 minutes or so.

    I stumbled upon this trailer I had never seen before after reading a bit about the movie. Werelisters might get a kick out of it. Hitchcock explained in an interview a few years after the movie came out that the 'point' of the movie was supposed to be how the relationship between man and nature has become lopsided, that it is taken for granted. It's really a shame this forum doesn't have an embedded video option yet... a link is such a mundane substitution.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCxR7dlavwg

    Time to pour one out for the New Year. Goodnight, and good luck!
    Last edited by TopBrass; December 31st, 2020 at 08:05 PM.
    "The first volume of the present publication has the aim of uncloaking these sheep, who take themselves and are taken for wolves; of showing how their bleating merely imitates in a philosophic form the conceptions of the German middle class; how the boasting of these philosophic commentators only mirrors the wretchedness of the real condition.." -Marx, The German Ideology

  3. #823
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    My family has rung in the new year by utterly failing at making injera (again), but we did manage to make a pretty good tart. I'm proud of that, at least.

    And we did get closer with the injera than we usually do. Perhaps five more years and it will actually be edible.
    "If you are worthy of his affection, a cat will be your friend but never your slave. He keeps his free will though he loves, and will not do for you what he thinks unreasonable; but if he once gives himself to you, it is with absolute confidence and fidelity of affection." -Theophile Gautier

  4. #824

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    I had to look that up. Ethiopian flatbread? Is there any particular reason you wanted to make that?

    Sounds like it could be good. I love flatbreads, but I'll probably always be partial to naan.
    "The first volume of the present publication has the aim of uncloaking these sheep, who take themselves and are taken for wolves; of showing how their bleating merely imitates in a philosophic form the conceptions of the German middle class; how the boasting of these philosophic commentators only mirrors the wretchedness of the real condition.." -Marx, The German Ideology

  5. #825
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    I love almost all breads, but I’ve never cared for injera!! I’m not sure if it’s the tartness of the fermentation liquid or what. Maybe to some extent the really soft spongy texture if offputting. I’m not sure. I’d try it again, but I’ve had it a few times now and haven’t liked it much.

    Speaking of bread, though, I’m thinking of making melon bread today (Japanese melonpan, not melon flavored haha).

  6. #826
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    Ah, to be a SoCal coyote resting on a patio in the sun.

    A small thing from today: I've realized that people can't tell what my gender is when they can't see my body. How do I know this? Kids. No filter. Months ago, a little boy at the grocery store said something about "that man", and his sister corrected him, "That's not a man, it's a lady!" Today I was bundled up against the Canadian winter. Kids were building snowmen. When I walked past one house, some kid said loudly, "Mommy, is that a boy or a girl?" The mom didn't answer. She was probably mortified. Hey, I'll take it, even if I don't have androgynous facial features and a relatively androgynous body. It's more that my masculine facial features and my long-ish shaggy hair and my body don't match. I identify as agender and nonbinary. "They/them" pronouns.

    But I want androgynous facial features. Dammit. If I could save up for cosmetic surgery...

    As for injera, I actually like the tartness, but I'm not crazy about the texture. It's so spongy and stretchy. I tolerate it because I enjoy Ethiopian food. But after the food's gone cold, the bread has to be tossed. You do not want to scoop up an Ethiopian dish with cold or reheated injera. Ugh. This was all restaurant food.

    Edit: This is a very small criticism, but I'm not a fan of Ethiopian coffee as it was served to me: dark and condensed, no cream or sugar, with salt sprinkled in.

    I love cooking, though, and I love hearing about people's cooking successes and occasional failures.
    Last edited by Coyote Jones; January 5th, 2021 at 06:29 AM.

  7. #827

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    And the capitol's getting stormed! Goddammit

  8. #828
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    I never really realized how easily visible Paramecium were before today. But they are remarkably easy to spot even without a microscope, if you're looking closely (and there are a bunch of them).

    Quote Originally Posted by TopBrass View Post
    I had to look that up. Ethiopian flatbread? Is there any particular reason you wanted to make that?

    Sounds like it could be good. I love flatbreads, but I'll probably always be partial to naan.
    My family makes Ethiopian food on New Year's. It's become something of a tradition over the past few years; we've enjoyed the food ever since visiting a place that served it in the Northeast about... six or so years ago? Seven? Eight? Something like that.

    There aren't many places that serve it, though, so we're limited to either going to Ethiopian places when we're in other cities or making it ourselves. Which has been difficult; there are other dishes we can't quite get right, but rewarding. And the chickpea wat recipe I found is quite simple to make, and fairly inexpensive.
    "If you are worthy of his affection, a cat will be your friend but never your slave. He keeps his free will though he loves, and will not do for you what he thinks unreasonable; but if he once gives himself to you, it is with absolute confidence and fidelity of affection." -Theophile Gautier

  9. #829

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    Quote Originally Posted by cheetah View Post
    My family makes Ethiopian food on New Year's. It's become something of a tradition over the past few years; we've enjoyed the food ever since visiting a place that served it in the Northeast about... six or so years ago? Seven? Eight? Something like that.

    There aren't many places that serve it, though, so we're limited to either going to Ethiopian places when we're in other cities or making it ourselves. Which has been difficult; there are other dishes we can't quite get right, but rewarding. And the chickpea wat recipe I found is quite simple to make, and fairly inexpensive.
    That's pretty weird, but very cool. My relatives are a traditional bunch when it comes to food, so much so that when I was marinading a Turkey to cook up last year, they washed off the cajun marinde when I wasn't looking before I started cooking it! "Too strong. Too spicy" they said. They hadn't even tried it! Seems to be kind of a white thing, bland and boring food. At least for people over 40.

    Traditions can be nice, but new traditions can be a welcome change. That kind of flexibility is good, especially when it comes to food. I've never had East African food, but I have had Ghanaian cuisine. That's amazingly good, but it tends to be heavy on the peppers, so I would be someone that likes it.
    "The first volume of the present publication has the aim of uncloaking these sheep, who take themselves and are taken for wolves; of showing how their bleating merely imitates in a philosophic form the conceptions of the German middle class; how the boasting of these philosophic commentators only mirrors the wretchedness of the real condition.." -Marx, The German Ideology

  10. #830

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    Over the years I have noticed a very brazen inconsistency in the reasoning of a lot of otherkin.

    It is a common belief that animals are self-conscious, thinking beings just as much as humans are. On its own, it's is an assortment that can be argued. Yet, many of the people that say this also insist that it is humans alone that are capable of evil, or are somehow uniquely evil. It seems to me that this is a simple, irreconcilable paradox. Something can only be evil to the extent that it can choose between good and evil as a 'free', conscious choice. Furthermore, that the mere act of thinking proper as such it itself this constitutive grounding gesture of evil itself, such that there is no thinking being which is also not in some sense evil.

    Hegel was the first to draw this connection, which he mentions in his lectures on the history of the philosophy of religion:

    Abstractly, being evil means singularizing myself in a way that cuts me off from the universal (which is the rational, the laws, the determinations of spirit). But along with this separation there arises being-for-itself and for the first time the universally spiritual, laws – what ought to be. So it is not the case that rational consideration has an external relationship to evil: it is itself what is evil.
    After God's comment in Genesis after Adam had eaten the forbidden fruit that, “Behold, Adam has become like one of us.”, Hegel comments that:

    So the serpent did not lie, for God confirms what it said. [...] Cognition is the principle of spirituality, and this … is also the principle by which the injury of the separation is healed. It is in this principle of cognition that the principle of ‘divinity’ is also posited. [...] it is the consideration or the cognition that makes people evil, so that consideration and cognition themselves are what is evil, and that therefore such cognition is what ought not to exist because it is the source of evil.
    I think Zizek summed up the significance of this passage well in his most recent book on the relevance of Hegel, briefly:

    In short, what makes us divine is our very fall (into Evil) since thinking is both at the same time, evil and reconciliation. Hegel is clear here: thinking not only opens up the choice between Good and Evil, thinking as such is evil since the reflexivity that it implies makes it operate at a distance from immediate substantial unity – when we think, we abstract, we tear up the unity of the object of thought. Simultaneously, this reflexive distance implied in thinking implies freedom (in our thoughts we are free – formally, at least).

    [...]

    This is how one should understand Hegel’s dictum from his Phenomenology that Evil is the gaze itself which perceives Evil everywhere around it: the gaze which sees Evil excludes itself from the social Whole it criticizes, and this exclusion is the formal characteristics of Evil. And Hegel’s point is that the Good emerges as a possibility and duty only through this primordial/constitutive choice of Evil: we experience the Good when, after choosing Evil, we become aware of the utter inadequacy of our situation.
    The significance is clear. Evil is an immanent property of thinking itself as such, such that there is no thinking being which is also simultaneously not evil. It renders the claim that animals and humans exist in a level of conscious equality, yet simultaneously that only humans are capable of being evil or uniquely evil unsustainable.

    Logically, it must be the case that if humans and animals are thinking beings, they are evil as a lot; or that none of them are thinking, conscious beings and thus that none of them are evil.

    It's hard not to get the conclusion that those preaching on the equality of humanity and animal life who simultaneously insist upon an alleged unique evilness to humanity are misanthropic nihilists. We thus arrive at a kind of weird inversion of therianthropy. For some, there is no positive content to their identity, no assertion of some kind of positive, self-sustaining animal essence; rather it is just a superficial edifice beyond which there is nothing but a simple anti-humanity, not an other-than-humanity.

    Definitely a trend I noticed in years past when I was part of the broader community. I don't know what the state of things is now with most people being kids and being on Amino or whatever, but I suspect it's probably still a thing.
    "The first volume of the present publication has the aim of uncloaking these sheep, who take themselves and are taken for wolves; of showing how their bleating merely imitates in a philosophic form the conceptions of the German middle class; how the boasting of these philosophic commentators only mirrors the wretchedness of the real condition.." -Marx, The German Ideology

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