Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Outdoor skills and useful information

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    somewhere in Russia
    Posts
    64

    Default Outdoor skills and useful information

    Back in the forum days we had a dedicated section of the forum related to outdoor skill, bushcraft, equipment, etc. I don't know how useful something like this will be here, but at least, there are some things I want to show. You can also share your experience or any useful information if you want. Or ask questions. I will appreciate it.


    While this forum is international, most of my skill (but not all) are probably better suited for northern climate. Also, probably, not everything will be possible because of different local regulations. I think in northern US, Canada, Finland, Norway and Sweden this will be mostly relevant.

    Usually this kind of topics called "survival", but I really dislike this term. It is perfectly possible to just live in natural environment with normal life, and if someone feels that it's hard to survive, than something already done horribly wrong. Also dislike typical survivalist's attitude to nature...

    __________________________________________________

    To start this thread I want to show something simple. How do you think, is it hard to just come into a frozen winter forest and build there a shelter for 4 persons, suitable for living for a few weeks with comfortable room temperature inside? Here was an experiment I made 7 years ago (so quality of photos is not very good):

    First, found a suitable location and built a frame:
    https://sun9-65.userapi.com/UdfAyPnC...bEbHVsYJlY.jpg

    Gather some spruce branches for the roof and additional thermal insulation.
    https://sun9-54.userapi.com/SPhSfcXR...-XgjDk2g1c.jpg

    This is half-build state, but already suitable for living. Basically, there is tent material tied from the inside of the frame, and spruce branches making roof and covering back wall, and all around. It takes me about 10 hours of work to build this, mostly alone.

    https://sun9-41.userapi.com/jbgW54tZ...foOtpQ3XdA.jpg
    https://sun9-26.userapi.com/8mkJ1RrM...KHPiW_Fsvk.jpg
    https://sun9-11.userapi.com/LnpnFM6O...5IRSsJd9B4.jpg
    https://sun9-60.userapi.com/vsPRj1WM...2ByPH9X9Cc.jpg

    First night was not particularly comfortable, because remnants of snow inside the shelter melted, and earth is slowly dried.

    Nice warm fire:
    https://sun9-52.userapi.com/YI51sZbx...OfKHFwOYP8.jpg

    A hole in the roof for smoke:
    https://sun9-55.userapi.com/PZjmPGfd...Z7Hp-VXLWU.jpg

    I'm still not mastered yet chum or teepee - like shelters related to smoke. Sometimes they are relatively smoky, sometimes not. But this one was very good and not smoky at all. Maybe because of its size.

    Inside view and my very old backpack in its original state (I completely remade it later). There were 4 sleeping places inside in the rhomb shape, with the gap for the entrance. And fireplace in the middle.
    https://sun9-50.userapi.com/Ddcw5o-P...vYaQL48UN0.jpg
    https://sun9-65.userapi.com/Zb0h538x...RPKdLgOnFo.jpg

    And now it is in a final state. More spruce branches were added (in Russian we have a special word for this kind of branches, call them "lapnic"), and walls were covered with snow.
    https://sun9-29.userapi.com/WHhula5l...cRJeiSken4.jpg
    https://sun9-66.userapi.com/NlTPbxJ7...-AHqq5xGkQ.jpg

    From the tree:
    https://sun9-41.userapi.com/PKyxTF-m...SVnWCxrne4.jpg

    Here is the temperature inside on the third day: +22 Celsius (+71 Fahrenheit)
    https://sun9-26.userapi.com/g9p7OPbf...qZjbRamxD4.jpg

    Final look:
    https://sun9-28.userapi.com/QsqLitZo...lpvRdqzDHU.jpg
    https://sun9-70.userapi.com/eM44Z0U4...FcaUyYwIss.jpg


    Couple of friends joined me on the second day and we lived there for 2 weeks. The temperature outside varied from -5 to -15 Celsius (22 to 5 Fahrenheit). After a couple of days the shelter becomes very comfortable to live. The earth warmed. When the fire burns in one place for a long time earth beneath and around it becomes very warm. It was nice to walk on a hot sand barefoot in the middle of winter). It also creates some thermal inertia effect that helps to maintain more or less constant temperature when fire was dimmed and flared again.


    The idea behind this shelter was pretty simple. Snow is a good thermal insulator. It increase the temperature from whatever is outside to 0 Celsius. Spruce branches are very good in stopping convection, and they work as additional insulator. They increase temperature from 0 to, say, 10 Celsius and protect snow from melting. And the layer of tent material rises it further.

    Total amount of work was about 16 to 18 hours. So it's nice to imagine how good the shelter could be if more time was added to construction and improvements. ))
    Last edited by Forest Wind; May 20th, 2020 at 02:56 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    3,034

    Default

    That's amazing, thanks for sharing it!

    Was it high enough to stand up straight in?

    "That's wolves for ya', good guys!" -Wolf, t10k
    wolf/werewolf & clouded leopard| 38 | female | writer | scuba diver | funny | chaotic good | Hufflepuff | INFP | eclectic witch

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    somewhere in Russia
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Yes, it was. At least in the middle near the fireplace.
    Last edited by Forest Wind; May 21st, 2020 at 11:48 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    134

    Default

    The shelter looks fantastic, thanks for sharing!

    I welcome the idea of having a thread or forum section dedicated to outdoor activities. I feel that it's something most wild-animal therians would benefit from.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    The West
    Posts
    3,571
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    That's great, I really need to learn more actual bushcraft. I had a book on it somewhere.

    As things are right now, I am mostly just pleased to finally have decent camping equipment. For a long time I was making do with stuff from when I was a kid - like, your average Walmart sleeping back, the size of a bale of hay.

    When I worked in Montana, I had a supervisor who was fantastic about teaching us different knots. Since I was usually miles and miles in the wilderness for a week and a half at a time, with almost no amenities, I practiced a lot. But of course, since I haven't practiced much since, I have forgotten a lot of what I learned. Some of those knots were really handy.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •