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Thread: Favorite Aspects of TTRPGs?

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    Talking Favorite Aspects of TTRPGs?

    I'm currently developing what I hope to be a series of alterhuman-inspired TTRPGs, with one complete and going through the final stages of beta testing and two more still being drafted. My project's gotten me thinking: for those of you who enjoy TTRPGs, what's your favorite aspects of them? What themes do you love to see in your game? Do you prefer long or short games? Do you have any you'd recommend? Do you have any stories from game past that you'd want to share?

    For me, I love anything improv-based. I like a wide berth to goof off or be serious as I like, especially if it's a game I'm playing with a group of close friends. I've always been someone who's more inclined towards the roleplay aspects than the strategy or combat aspects of rpg games, because it's just what I find most fun. Getting to build up a character and watch them grow (or spiral) is something I feel deeply satisfying, especially if the game is one where I can get very attached to the character in question.

    My ADHD makes it hard to sit and start playing anything, but once I'm settled I especially love longer, multi-session games like D&D and Delta Green (which I highly recommend if you like cryptids, monsters, the eldritch, SCPs, and similar). I've tried a few shorter games like It's In the Vents! which have also been fun, but it just doesn't scratch the same itch that a session four or five hours long does.


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    I like long games--but don't play many. Practically, actually managing to complete a campaign for one has always been an issue. I've always been stuck, really, with online games, and those frequently die faster than a twenty four hour house fly. I don't go for games I know will be short, but often they end up that way anyway. Which sucks.

    Mechanically, I like the system being capable of handling things other than combat, and those mechanics not just being an afterthought. This is why I like the various World of Darkness games and FATE more than Pathfinder and Dungeons and Dragons--I do like to play in games with those systems, but if you have a Pathfinder character the sheet almost entirely revolves around how they kill people. In terms of narrativeness versus crunchiness, I like a middle ground that doesn't micromanage everything (like d20, and it's tendency to carefully define every aspect of a spell) but has mechanics finely grained enough to account for a large set of situations.

    On that note, I would highly recommend people check out the World of Darkness games, particularly Werewolf: the Apocalypse. It has its flaws, but it's one of the few games that spends a lot of space (mechanically and in the setting) giving me the tools to play my theriotype, let alone a properly animal PC. It's easier to play a character like that, and more interesting.

    Thematically, I enjoy games with a strong focus on nature and the outdoors. Not a very big fan of grimdarkness or nihilism--I'm fine with my preferred side being on the defensive and outmatched, but don't like things to be hopeless or for the PCs to be the only decent people around. This being said, I also prefer to not have them being larger than life heroes who resolve entire wars all by themselves, as sometimes happens in d20 once you get to the higher levels. Again, the WoD games (sometimes) do a decent job of this by having the PCs be members of a larger network fighting towards the same goal; while they might only be active in a small town they are part of a larger conflict.

    Are you using an already existing system for the games you're designing, or designing a new one? If the former, what is it?
    Last edited by cheetah; October 13th, 2021 at 07:24 PM.
    "If you are worthy of his affection, a cat will be your friend but never your slave. He keeps his free will though he loves, and will not do for you what he thinks unreasonable; but if he once gives himself to you, it is with absolute confidence and fidelity of affection." -Theophile Gautier

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    Quote Originally Posted by cheetah View Post
    Are you using an already existing system for the games you're designing, or designing a new one? If the former, what is it?
    For the game going through the final stages of beta testing, we're using the Wretched and Alone system as seen in games such as The Sealed Library. For the second and third games still in development, we're using the Carta system, but that could change during this drafting period if we feel like Carta isn't robust enough for some of the complexity we would like to put in.

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    So they're all going to be single player games?
    "If you are worthy of his affection, a cat will be your friend but never your slave. He keeps his free will though he loves, and will not do for you what he thinks unreasonable; but if he once gives himself to you, it is with absolute confidence and fidelity of affection." -Theophile Gautier

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    These first three are going to be GM-less solo rpgs, with a potential second-player option for the ones based around the Carta system. We're saving larger and more complex GM-driven, multiplayer systems for later projects when we have more game design experience under our belt.

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    Sounds interesting.

    What's the premise for the three games you're working on?
    "If you are worthy of his affection, a cat will be your friend but never your slave. He keeps his free will though he loves, and will not do for you what he thinks unreasonable; but if he once gives himself to you, it is with absolute confidence and fidelity of affection." -Theophile Gautier

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    The first game's premise is that the player has gotten thrown from their previous world and body into that of a standard human in a medieval fantasyesque Earth. The goal of this game is to ideally figure out a way to return to the world (and hopefully body) you originally come from, but the odds of that are slim at absolute best. This game leans heavy onto roleplay and journaling.

    The second and third games are currently connected to one another and have a soft premise of the player having been turned physically into a monster (species of the player's choice), kicked out by their family, and ridiculed/mocked/shunned by the town. They're cold, alone, and above all, starving. This culminates in two separate games: the DINE & DASH version, and the GORE & VIOLENCE version. The former is meant to be silly, ridiculous, and PG-13, where the player navigates a board of cards ransacking homes' pantries and scaring restaurant patrons to eat their food, while the latter is meant to be almost cartoonishly violent and gore-and-guts filled, where the character is going around and eating the people of the town who have been assholes to them. But, like I said, these two are still in development and I'm testing where I want to go with them (and if I want to completely disconnect them from each other, or keep them pseudo-connected by system, map, and play style).

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